Homemade Wicking Boxes

Author: Gillian Vance   Date Posted:2 June 2016 

When I first heard about wicking beds I wondered if they had a place in my garden.  Surely growing in the ground was the best way to garden?  I work so hard at getting my soil rich and fertile – why on earth would I want to revert back to growing in containers?  

 

I looked at the pros and cons of wicking beds and realised that in certain instances they might just be the answer to some of the ongoing problems in my small tropical garden:

 

  • Microgreens:  Traditionally they are grown in a small amount of soil and need to be kept moist constantly as they are really just baby plants, grown tightly packed.  Since I work fulltime, watering the little plants two or three times a day is not possible.  In the past I have struggled with sprouts and microgreens because of this exact problem, and wicking boxes proved to be the answer.   Below I have some very happy little radish and kale microgreens in a wicking box.

 

wicking_image1

 

  • Soil diseases:  Here in the tropics we have a disease in the soil that prevents us growing most plants in the solanacea family(tomato, capsicum, eggplant, etc).  Bacterial wilt means the plants grow nice and healthy and then overnight they wilt and die.  Who wants to have a garden without growing eggplant and tomatoes?  Not me.  Using wicking boxes I can control the soil that the plants are growing in.  The eggplant in the picture below have been growing in their wicking boxes for three years.

 

wicking_image2

 

  • Water hungry plants:  Often gardeners will suggest growing mint under a dripping tap – some plants are very thirsty and I discovered that mint(pictured below), parsley and even baby lettuces love the consistent supply of moisture that wicking beds provide.

 

wicking_image3

 


 

How to make a Wicking Box

So – how does one construct a wicking box?

I like to use the polysterene boxes that are used for seafood in our supermarkets, it also keeps them out of the landfills by giving them a second life.  

 

What you need:

You just need a few things –

  • A box
  • Some kind of small rocks
  • Cloth (to cover rocks)
  • Knife or scissors
  • Soil

 

wicking_image4

 

Method:

1.  Place your scoria or small rocks in the base of the box.  In the picture below I'm using pumice – I like to use something light so that it doesn’t make the boxes too heavy.  This layer only needs to be 10 – 15mm deep.

2.  Make a hole through the side of the box just above the rocks – this means than any water below that level will stay in the box to be wicked up to the plant roots and the rest can drain out.

 

 

 

wicking_image5

 

 

3. Then lay over a permeable fabric that will separate the rocks from the soil, I use chux cloths, but you can also use shade cloth or hessian. 

 

4.  Take a plastic bottle and cut the bottom off and then invert it at one end of the box, cutting a hole through the cloth, but resting on a few small rocks so that the bottle is not resting on the bottom – this allows easy access for the water to flow through. I normally cut a small polysterene cover out of the lid too, so that mosquitoes cannot enter into the water and breed. 

 

wicking_image6

 

5.  Then fill the boxes with potting mix mixed with a little coir and a bit of manure and/or compost.  Water well until you see water flowing out of the overflow hole.  Sprinkle with your seeds, or plant your seedlings, then step back and watch the magic!

 

wicking_image7

 

The best way for plants to access water is to wick it up from the bottom reservoir and I find that I only need to add water to the inlet about once a week.   You can add a bit of liquid seaweed at watering time as well and that will gently feed the plants. 

 

I hope you enjoy your adventure into wicking boxes as much as I do!

 

Article and photos by By Gillian Vance.

Australian ownedThe Seed Collection Pty Ltd is an Australian owned and operated business based in Ferntree Gully, Victoria.

 

We specialise in:

  • Herb, vegetable and flower seeds. 
  • Heirloom, open pollinated, non-hybrid and non GMO varieties with no chemical treatments.
  • Custom made seed packets

 

It's our aim to make more seeds, more accessible to more people. It's our aim to help you.  We don't waste resources on unnecessary packaging or marketing.  Instead we supply our seeds in simple packaging and count on our customers to spread the word about our business by telling their friends. This ultimately means we are able to offer our seeds at a significantly better price than most other seed suppliers.  Don't believe us?  Browse our catalogue and see for yourself ;)

 

We hope you have fun browsing our website and look forward to taking your order :) 

 

Happy gardening!

-The Seed Collection


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Comments (4)

5 October 2016
I like using wicking boxes. It makes gardening easier. However, I have noticed that a lot of waterproof boxes are not all that attractive to look at. So, if you want to use wood or something else that is not quite water proof, like me, I would recommend using builders film as a waterproof liner. ***link removed***


By: on 30 August 2016
Peter and Marie, yes I love mint in wicking boxes for just that reason! Beverly, wow those sound like huge structures. I often put a little worm tube in my wicking beds to add extra nutrients.


By: on 5 July 2016
Thanks for the idea I do remember my father having one many ,many years ago and I never took any notice of it .we only have a small area but with a lot of planning we have managed to grow lots of veggies, one thing we don't grow is mint , due to the fact it spreads so fast and can take over before you know this will control it perfectly and maintain the water that's needed. Once again we have enjoyed your news letter !


19 June 2016
i loved this . my husband built me wicking boxes a couple of years ago.There are five in my vegi patch.Five metres long ,one metre wide,In the centre of each box ,there is a compost section.lovely to work in.Beverly Sharp.